laughingsquid posted an installation featuring the likeness of unlikely artist Ferdinand Cheval. (Link here)

Ferdinand Cheval (1836-1924) spent 33 years painstakingly building the creation above, Le Palais idéal. Here is a quote of his about this awe-inspiring piece of artistic architecture:

"I was walking very fast when my foot caught on something that sent me stumbling a few meters away, I wanted to know the cause. In a dream I had built a palace, a castle or caves, I cannot express it well… I told no one about it for fear of being ridiculed and I felt ridiculous myself. Then fifteen years later, when I had almost forgotten my dream, when I wasn’t thinking of it at all, my foot reminded me of it. My foot tripped on a stone that almost made me fall. I wanted to know what it was… It was a stone of such a strange shape that I put it in my pocket to admire it at my ease. The next day, I went back to the same place. I found more stones, even more beautiful, I gathered them together on the spot and was overcome with delight… It’s a sandstone shaped by water and hardened by the power of time. It becomes as hard as pebbles. It represents a sculpture so strange that it is impossible for man to imitate, it represents any kind of animal, any kind of caricature."

"I said to myself: since Nature is willing to do the sculpture, I will do the masonry and the architecture…"

The building consists of cement, lime and mortar. He wanted to eventually be buried in his creation, which was forbidden in France. He went on to spend another 8 years to construct a mausoleum in which to be buried.

The last picture is of the stones he originally tripped over, the inspiration for this lifelong labor of artistic determination.

Antiquing afternoon.

Snapshot of newest project: Skittish

Snapshot of newest project: Skittish

Hot town, summer in the city. Back of my neck getting dirt and gritty.

Hot town, summer in the city. Back of my neck getting dirt and gritty.

Branch.
Garden twine on canvas.

laughingsquid:

An Incredible Anamorphic Portrait Installation of French Artist Ferdinand Cheval by Bernard Pras

Just love this installation. It is made even more powerful if the viewer is aware of Cheval’s artistic history. For 33 years he picked up stones while on his route as a mailman, and brought them home to build his “Ideal Palace.” I think I might dedicate an entire post to him because it is so interesting!

laughingsquid:

An Incredible Anamorphic Portrait Installation of French Artist Ferdinand Cheval by Bernard Pras

Just love this installation. It is made even more powerful if the viewer is aware of Cheval’s artistic history. For 33 years he picked up stones while on his route as a mailman, and brought them home to build his “Ideal Palace.” I think I might dedicate an entire post to him because it is so interesting!

The Children at the Border

newyorker:

image

More than 50,000 unaccompanied children have been caught streaming across the Mexican border since last fall. William Finnegan weighs in on the Obama Administration’s response to the crisis: http://nyr.kr/1jlGOd6

Photograph: Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters

xombiedirge:

Old Superheroes by Lesley Vamos / Tumblr / Website

Some days you just feel like a washed-up superhero. Today is one of those days.


Pola Negri in Sumurun (1920)

Loving those intense facial reactions.

Pola Negri in Sumurun (1920)

Loving those intense facial reactions.

daitao:

by mikkun 

daitao:

by mikkun 

"Keep your face always to the sunshine,
and the shadows will fall behind you.”

-Walt Whitman

"Keep your face always to the sunshine,

and the shadows will fall behind you.”

-Walt Whitman

"To me, every hour of the light and dark is a miracle,Every inch of space is a miracle,Every square yard of the surface of the earth is spread with the same,Every cubic foot of the interior swarms with the same;Every spear of grass—the frames, limbs, organs, of men and women, and all that concerns them,All these to me are unspeakably perfect miracles.To me the sea is a continual miracle;The fishes that swim—the rocks—the motion of the waves—the ships, with men in them,What stranger miracles are there?” 

-Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass

"To me, every hour of the light and dark is a miracle,
Every inch of space is a miracle,
Every square yard of the surface of the earth is spread with the same,
Every cubic foot of the interior swarms with the same;
Every spear of grass—the frames, limbs, organs, of men and women, and all that concerns them,
All these to me are unspeakably perfect miracles.
To me the sea is a continual miracle;
The fishes that swim—the rocks—the motion of the waves—the ships, with men in them,
What stranger miracles are there?” 

-Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass

“This is what you shall do: Love the earth and the sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and with the mothers of families, read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, reexamine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body.” -Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass

“This is what you shall do: Love the earth and the sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and with the mothers of families, read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, reexamine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body.” 

-Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass